Last edited by Akile
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of skeletal biology of archaic populations of the Great Lakes region found in the catalog.

skeletal biology of archaic populations of the Great Lakes region

Canada. National Museums of Canada. National Museum of Man.

skeletal biology of archaic populations of the Great Lakes region

by Canada. National Museums of Canada. National Museum of Man.

  • 182 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by National Museums of Canada., National Museum of Man in Ottawa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Anthropometry -- Great Lakes region.,
  • Physical anthropology.,
  • Somatotypes.,
  • Prehistoric peoples -- Great Lakes region.,
  • Excavations (Archaeology) -- Great Lakes Region.,
  • Great Lakes region -- Antiquities.

  • Edition Notes

    6

    StatementSusan Pfeiffer.
    SeriesMercury series -- no. 64
    ContributionsPfeiffer, Susan.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination384 p. :
    Number of Pages384
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21592814M

    In this study, paleopathology and skeletal biology were used to examine dogs from 44 Archaic, Woodland, Mississippian, and protohistoric sites in Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee. Most of the dogs examined represent intentional burials, although a few, mostly from Illinois, are from contexts suggesting consumption. Articles: Revisiting Indigenous Structures of New England: A Survey of Ethnohistoric Accounts From the Contact Period (Henry Glick, p. 1–36); Remembering Stone Piles in New England (Timothy H. Ives, p. 37–80); The Lower Great Lakes Fur Trade, Local Economic Sustainability, and the Bone Grease Buffer: Vertebrate Faunal Remains From the.

      Ardipithecus, then, represents a shift away from the primitive locomotion employed by the last common ancestor of our line and that of modern is a hominin that maintained a link with its tree-dwelling past and yet had progressed toward the bipedal future. This evidence is striking because it firmly demonstrates that a species had arisen that was advanced in the human direction. The Bronze Age is a historical period that was characterized by the use of bronze, and in some areas proto-writing, and other early features of urban Bronze Age is the second principal period of the three-age Stone-Bronze-Iron system, as proposed in modern times by Christian Jürgensen Thomsen, for classifying and studying ancient societies.

    Doing Zooarchaeology as if It Mattered: Use of Faunal Data to Address Current Issues in Fish Conservation Biology in Owens Valley, California. In Zooarchaeology and Conservation Biology, edited by Lyman, R. L. and Cannon, K. P., pp. 25– University of Utah Press, Salt Lake by:   The first is restricted to the populations of North and East Africa and the Near East, whereas X2 encompasses all X mtDNAs from Europe, western and Central Asia, Siberia, and the great majority of the Near East, as well as some North African samples. Subhaplogroup X1 diversity indicates an early coalescence time, whereas X2 has apparently.


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Skeletal biology of archaic populations of the Great Lakes region by Canada. National Museums of Canada. National Museum of Man. Download PDF EPUB FB2

Skeletal Biology of Archaic Populations of the Great Lakes Region Susan Pfeiffer Published by University of Ottawa Press Pfeiffer, Susan. Skeletal Biology of Archaic Populations of the Great Lakes Region.

Get this from a library. The skeletal biology of archaic populations of the Great Lakes region. [Susan Pfeiffer] -- Doctoral thesis University of Toronto, Examines ten samples of Archaic skeletal material from the Great Lakes region with an emphasis on information.

Ten samples of skeletal material, from the archaeological sites of Morrison’s Island, Allumette Island, Hind, Cole, Picton, Frontenac Island, Oconto, Riverside, Osceola, and Reigh, are described and examined with regard to cremation techniques, pathological conditions, dental characteristics and population by: Skeletal Biology of Archaic Populations of the Great Lakes Region Book Description: Ten samples of skeletal material, from the archaeological sites of Morrison’s Island, Allumette Island, Hind, Cole, Picton, Frontenac Island, Oconto, Riverside, Osceola, and Reigh, are described and examined with regard to cremation techniques, pathological.

Cite this Record. Skeletal Biology of Archaic Populations of the Great Lakes Region. Pfeiffer. National Museum of Man Mercury Series,1. Montreal, Ontario: National Museum of Man. (tDAR id: ). The Skeletal Biology of Archaic Populations of the Great Lakes Region, National Museum of Man Mercury Series, Number 64 National Museums of Canada, Ottawa.

Edited Books Williamson, Ronald F., S. Pfeiffer, editors. Bones of the Ancestors: The Archaeology and Osteobiography of the Moatfield Site. Archaeological Survey of Canada Mercury.

The Skeletal Biology of Archaic Populations of the Great Lakes Region. National Museum of Man, Mercury Series No.

64, Ottawa, Canada. National Museum of Man, Mercury Series No. 64, Ottawa, Canada. Google ScholarCited by: archaic populations of the Great Lakes., IssuesSusan Pfeiffer,Social Science, pages.

Doctoral thesis University of Toronto, Examines ten samples of Archaic skeletal material from the Great Lakes region with an emphasis on information concerning the Introduccion.

Pfeiffer, S.,The Skeletal Biology of Archaic Populations of the Great Lakes Region, National Museums of Canada, Ottawa, Archaeological Survey of Canada Paper Google ScholarCited by: The skeletal biology of archaic populations of the Great Lakes region [Susan Pfeiffer]. FC 65 P37 NO Archaeology and ethnohistory in the Arrow Lakes, Southeastern British Columbia Christopher J.

Turnbull. The skeletal biology of archaic populations of the Great Lakes region. Hymie Rubenstein: (S.B. Philpott) Black adaptive stategies: coping with poverty in an eastern Caribbean village. David Stymeist: (R.W. Dunning) The permanent resident -outsider distinction in Sioux Lookout, Ontario.

Sonja Jerkic: (D.R. Hughes). This book deals with the prehistory of the region encompassed by the present state of Alabama and spans a period of s years-from B.C. and the. Australopithecus africanus are known from the Transvaal region of South Africa and are - mya.

Many features of the cranium of A. africanus are more human-like than that of earlier A. afarensis, including a more globular cranium and slightly higher ratio of brain size to body size.

East Africa or Eastern Africa is the eastern region of the African continent, variably defined by the United Nations Statistics Division scheme of geographic regions, 20 territories make up Eastern Africa. Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and South Sudan are members of the East African Community (EAC).

The first five are also included in the African Great Lakes region. That so-called archaic humans achieved such a sophisticated lifestyle quite separately from that of modern human populations, leads us to the potential impact of the Denisovans on the development of our own civilization, a matter examined by the present writer in new book The Cygnus Key.

Multiple terminal Pleistocene and early Holocene paleontological specimens of caribou are known from the Great Lakes (Lemke ), many contemporary with Paleoindian occupation of the region based. Multiregional: In this model, Homo sapiens developed out of Homo erectus in more than one region, thru gene flow and some intermixing of populations.

With this model, there is interbreeding between different "species." (or sub-species)Archaic Homo sapiens and Neanderthals then are on the same evolutionary line as modern humans. Milner GR, Katzenberg MA. Contributions of Skeletal Biology to Great Lakes Archaeology.

In Taming the Taxonomy: Toward a New Understanding of Great Lakes Archaeology, Williamson RF, Watts CM, eds, pp. Eastendbooks, Toronto. Milner GR, Oliver JS. Late Prehistoric Settlements and Wetlands in the Central Mississippi Valley.

Accolades: Selected as a Notable Book of the Year for by the New York Times Book Review. Other Editions: Paperback, Second edition, Tenth Anniversary Edition, with a New Preface, Analysis of the Maddie Stewart and Old Town skeletal populations Analysis of Monongahela skeletal samples (California University, Pennsylvania) Analysis of the Kerniskey and Grantham skeletal populations (Cleveland Museum of Natural History) Analysis of the Lake View Farms, Carty and Danbury skeletal samples.

For the same reasons that explorers of the early twentieth century strove to reach the poles, and their modern counterparts journey to outer space, most people want to visualize the contours of the human experience - the peaks of adaptive success that led to the expansion of civilization, and the troughs in which human presence ebbed.

The Backbone of History defines the emerging field of 2/5(1).‘archaic’ traits, some of which occur quite late in the fossil record Such fossils belie the notion that there is a clear transition from ‘archaic’ to ‘modern’ skeletal form in our ancestral lineage.

Indeed, they may well point to the possibility that there is something inherently wrong with theFile Size: KB.It has already been proved genetically, linguistically, historically, artistically, etc.

All the genetic studies from Marin et. al.Hawass et. al.DNA Tribes/JAMAand DNA Tribes/JAMA have resulted in unamed predynastic ruler.